• Facts & Figure

    Facts & Figure

Numbers

The Nepal Himalaya holds 225 peaks over 6000m and of course eight of the fourteen 8000ers. You can see quite a few of these magnificent spires just by looking out of your Yeti Mountain Home loge windows

Mt Everest 8,848M

Mt Everest 8,848M

Kanchenjunga 8,586M

Kanchenjunga 8,586M

Lhotse 8,516M

Lhotse 8,516M

Makalu 8,463M

Makalu 8,463M

Cho Oyu 8,201M

Cho Oyu 8,201M

Dhaulagiri 8,167M

Dhaulagiri 8,167M

Manaslu 8,163M

Manaslu 8,163M

Annapurna 8,091

Annapurna 8,091

Histories

The Himalaya are among the youngest mountain ranges on the planet and consist mostly of uplifted sedimentary and metamorphic rock. According to the modern theory of plate tectonics, their formation is a result of a continental collision along the convergent boundary between the Indo-Australian Plate and the Eurasian Plate between 65 and 55 million years ago (Upper Cretaceous). The resultant uplifted and heavily folded rock has since been weathered and eroded down to the, still immense forms, we see today.

The Himalayan belt has both the highest rate of uplift (nearly 10 mm/year at Nanga Parbatand among the highest erosion rates at 2–12 mm/yr. In Hinduism, the Himalayas have been personified as the god Himavat, father of Ganga and Parvati